Before/After

I have had a lot of you asking for editing tips, and always get questions about my work how I get the images I get.  So in 2014 I am going to be putting an emphasis on teaching, and of course doing a better job blogging.  Photography is unique in that it is both a science, and an art.  Many photography workshops are great tools and learning opportunities for the science behind the photography but the art is a lot more complicated.  Now more than ever, the post-processing of photography is SUCH a large part of what we do, an so few photographers are willing to let their "secrets" out.  I know how hard it was when I first started to understand all of these crazy photography shooting, and editing techniques that I want to be a resource!  SO, here we go!  Hopefully I can help answer some questions and help some of you along the way!  Also, this is how I work, it's not right, it's not wrong, it's just what I like, and I'm guessing my clients as well(I'm guessing, because they did book me!)

I am starting with this image for a couple of reasons.  First, it's not shot perfectly.  My goal with every photo that I take is to have to do as little in post as I can.  BUT, situations don't always allow us to do that! (secret is out, I over-expose my images just like everyone else)  In wedding photography, the most important thing I can do is catch a MOMENT.  This image is a great example.  I do my best to put my couples in situations that allow them to be who they are with each other...not who I'm hoping they will be.  Though I want to shoot PERFECT every time I hit the shutter, chances are that won't happen. That doesn't mean I don't strive for this however.  If I was sitting too worried about getting this perfect in camera, I would have missed this moment! This photo was taken probably an hour before sunset...for winter, probably a little too early to really get that golden-hour, back-lit kind of photo everyone loves.  In summer, no problem, but here, we have the reflection of the snow to worry about, that causes a lot MORE light than we normally get at that time of day.  Thus, the reason for my over-exposure.  BUT, of course, shooting in RAW can really help recover a lot of those details in the highlights and shadows.  The main goal I always shoot for is really yummy skin tones! (Yes, yummy tones)  This is one of the hardest things to do in an uncontrolled environment like most weddings occur in.  Also, I see this all of the time in photographers starting out. Everyone wants nice color tones, but the tough part is getting nice bold colors without making the skin orange(boosting the saturation slider should be illegal in all 50 states, and in 99% of your photos taken with people in them.  For this photo, I have adjusted my exposure value down to account for my over-exposed photo.  Also, have taken some of the saturation out, but only a TINY amount,  just because of those orangey tones I don't like.  I've added a small contrast light curve, as well as some contrast from the "contrast" slider, and taken my black output levels up to lighten up those darks.  (Adjusting your black output levels in photoshop starts to give your photo that washed-out/film-like look...but be careful, and don't go nuts with it!)  I've warmed this image up a little bit with my white balance, and lastly, sharpened.  That's about it! 

 (all of my post-processing is done with Capture One Pro)

(all of my post-processing is done with Capture One Pro)